1838: Abijah Allen to Col. Roger Quarles

St. Francis County, Arkansas

This letter was written by twenty-year-old Abijah Allen (1818-1868), son of William Allen (1790-1846) and Mary Morgan (1794-1821). Abijah married Celia Henrietta Mebane (1828-1905) in 1856. In 1860, Abijah Allen had a plantation in St. Francis County, Arkansas with approximately 50 slaves.

This letter was written to Col. Roger Quarles (1772-1856), the son of William Quarles and Mary Mills.

Hurricane Hall was built in the 1790s in Fayette County, Kentucky by David Laughed on the Lexington-Georgetown Pike. It was purchased in 1803 by Colonel Roger Quarles. Quarles with his wife, Jane Rodes Thomson Quarles and their 2 children came from Virginia. Colonel Quarles was a gentleman farmer. The Fayette County Kentucky tax list in 1826 listed 1,563 acres (633 ha), 30 slaves, 33 horses and 1 pleasure carriage.

Hurricane Hall has some rather interesting features. The front door opens into a 15-foot-wide hall (4.6 m). One of the most appealing decorative features is the French scenic wallpaper in the parlor and hallway to commemorate the wedding of their daughter, Sarah Anna Eliza Quarles to William Z. Thomson in 1817.

Stampless Cover

Page 1

Page 2

Page 3

TRANSCRIPTION

Addressed to Col. Roger Quarles, Fayette County, Donorale P.O., Kentucky

St. Francis City, Arkansas
September 23d 1838

Mr. & Mrs. Quarles
Dear friends,

I have embraced the opportunity of writing you a few lines which leaves me in good health and I hope they will reach you enjoying the same blessing. My health has been verry good ever since I left your house. I got home safe with my negroes the 21st inst. I had a verry tiresome time of it on the river. I was ten days in the Ohio River. We was detained in consequence of low water. When I got home, I found my Father and Family all in good health and our neighborhood is generally tolerable healthy.

Serine has behaved herself verry well since I got home and Jerry attends to his business as well as I could wish. And they all are apparently verry well satisfied. I regret that I have nothing worthy to communicate at this time but hope I will be able to write a more interesting letter next time.

I will now give you a full description of our crops in this country. Our earliest planting of corn is verry good as it made itself before the drouth set in. Our latest planting of corn is smartly injured by the drouth although the drouth has not been quite so lengthy with us as it has been with you. Our cotton crops are tolerable good. We have the most indifferent potatoes that we have ever had in this country. We have a verry fine mast this year. The oak timber is as full as I ever saw it.

There was a Camp Meeting in our county that ended the 20th. My Father and family was at it. They tell me there was upwards of twenty professed religion. There was a Camp Meeting held in Tennessee about fifty miles from my Father’s and there was one hundred and five persons converted at it. I am told that there has been the greatest revivals throughout Tennessee & Arkansas that has ever been known in one season before.

It is quite seasonable and pleasant here at this time. We had a little frost this morning but it was barely discoverable.

I expect to start up the St. Francis River in a few days to hunt timber and if I should be fortunate enough to find timber for sale convenient to the river, I shall but it and if I should not, I shall cut enough for one or two fine rafts and run them to New Orleans.

I shall like to hear from you as soon and as often as convenient. Direct your letter to St. Francis County, St. Francis P. O., Arkansas. Give my respects to Mr. Thomson and family and tell Henry that I would be glad to receive a letter from him as soon as it is convenient. Give my respects to Mr. Leak & Mr. Brown and write how they are both doing.

I have nothing more worth relating but will forever remember you for your kindness to me in your house. I remain your sincere and affectionate friend, — Abijah Allen

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Yankee Volunteer

A Virtual Archive of Civil War Likenesses collected by Dave Morin

William Henry Jordan

Co. K, 7th Rhode Island Infantry

No Cause to Blush

The Bancroft Collection of Civil War Letters

William A. Bartlett Civil War Letters

Company D, 37th Massachusetts Infantry

The John Hughes Collection

A Virtual Archive of his Letters, 1858-1869

The Civil War Letters of Rufus P. Staniels

Co. H, 13th New Hampshire Volunteers

This is Indeed A Singular War

The Civil War Letters of Henry Scott Murray, 8th New York Light Artillery

The Letters of James A. Durrett

Co. E, 18th Alabama Infantry

Spared & Shared 15

Saving History One Letter at a Time

The Civil War Letters of George Messer

Company F, 107th Illinois Volunteer Infantry

Jeff's Prayers are as Effective as Abe's

The Civil War Letters of George S. Youngs, 126th New York Vols

Soldiering is a Very Uncertain Game

The Civil War Letters of Lemuel Glidden, Co. K, 145th Indiana Infantry

Tough as a Pitch Pine Knot

Letters of John Whitcomb Piper, 4th Massachusetts Heavy Artillery

An Honorable Peace

The Civil War Letters of Frank B. Knause, 6th Michigan Infantry & Heavy Artillery

Looking for a Rebel to Give him a Pop

Letters to & from Sgt. John Henry Ward, 93rd PA Inf

Civil War Letters of William H. H. Kinsey

Co. H, 28th Illinois Infantry

Spared & Shared 14

Saving History One Letter at a Time

The 1863 Diary of Thomas Wilbur Manchester

A Rhode Island Soldier in the American Civil War

The Daniels/Stone Digital Archives

A Collection of Family Civil War Era Letters & Ephemera

Spared & Shared 13

Saving Civil War History One Letter At A Time

Dear Nellie

Civil War Letters of Thomas L. Bailey

Homefront Letters to Mark Rankin

Co. B, 27th Massachusetts Vols.

These Troubling Times...

The Civil War Letters of William H. Walton, Co. B, 3rd New Hampshire

Reluctant Yanks

The Civil War Letters of Joseph F. & B. Franklin Orr, Co. F, 76th Ohio Infantry

Hunting rebels as a dog would a fox....

The Civil War Letters of George W. Scott of Co. I, 46th Massachusetts (Militia)

The Civil War Letters of William Hunt Goff

Company H, 24th Massachusetts

The Charles Wetmore Broadfoot Letters

Aide de Camp to Gen. Theophilus H. Holmes

Spared & Shared 11

Saving History One Letter at a Time

Billy Yank & Johnny Reb Letters

Civil War Letters Transcribed by Griff

To the Front

The Civil War Letters of David Brett, 9th Massachusetts Light Artillery

Dear Jack

Letters received by Dr. John William Crapster O'Neal

For the Union

Civil War Letters of William Freeland, Co. F, 132nd New York Infantry

I Shall be Willing to Suffer

The Civil War Letters of Marquis Lafayette Holt of the 3rd New Hampshire Infantry

"Shall the Union be Preserved?"

The Civil War Letters of William Henry Hodgkins -- Co. B, 36th Massachusetts

The Civil War Letters of William Busby

A Private in Co H, 20th Iowa Vols

Diary of Henry Knox Danner

The Civil War Experience of a Private in Co. K, 30th Pennsylvania Infantry (1862-1864)

Franklin S. Twitchell

Co. B, 13th Connecticut Infantry

The Civil War Letters of Henry E. Mumford

A Colored Soldier of Co. B, 29th Connecticut Infantry

No Babies Play

Letters of Joseph Hazen, Co. F, 20th New York Cavalry

I Long to See You Again

The Civil War Letters of Willis McDonald, Co. F, 17th Connecticut Infantry

I stood in my tracks

The Civil War Letters of Benjamin F. Hulburd, 7th & 2nd Vermont Infantries

This fight will tell the story

Letters by Harlan P. Martin, Co. E, 123rd N.Y.V.

The Rebecca Breidenstein Collection

Letters addressed to Rebecca by both her first & second husbands during the Civil War

The Smoke of my Rifle

A small collection of letters by Capt. Augustus Alonzo Hoit of Co. G, 8th Maine Infantry

%d bloggers like this: