1847: Philip Losey to Joshua Predmore

This letter was begun by Mary Losey (1828-1900), the eldest daughter of Philip Losey (1806-1882) and Mahala Predmore (1810-1860). Philip and Mahala were married in 1826 in New Jersey. Philip finished the letter, which was addressed to his wife’s parents, Joshua Predmore (1784-1854) and Joshua’s second wife, Jemima Griggs (1790-1866). Philip’s parents were Cornelius Losey (1777-1848) and Abigail Tuttle (1774-1857).

We learn from this letter that the Losey family lived in Orion, Oakland County, Michigan in 1847. The 1850 Census enumerates them in that same location though the 1860 Census gives their residence as Brandon, Michigan.

Mahala’s sister, Delila Predmore (1815-1893) who married Jonathan Sutton (1807-1874) in 1832, is also mentioned in the letter.

TRANSCRIPTION

Addressed to Mr. Joshua Predmore, Sparta, Sussex County, New Jersey

Orion [Michigan]
September 7th 1847

Dear Grandmother,

We received your letter this morning and were glad to hear that you arrived at home in good health and that our friends generally are well. We are well as usual and have been since you left except Grandfather. He has been a good deal worn some of the time; the weather is very hot and dry which has caused considerable sickness, different fevers, but chiefly intermittent and the ague. Every one of Uncle Lewis and Uncle Jonathan’s folks have had it. We have escaped so far except myself. I have had two or three slight chills. We have had lots of sport with Israel about breaking it, He will break it and in a few days or weeks they will have it again but he says never mind, he will break it up for awhile.

Mrs. Govan and Lucretia have both been very sick. She had the chill fever and Lucretia a remittent fever. They are getting better now. We hope there will be rain soon, We had a shower Saturday night but did not wet in the ground much. Corn and buckwheat will do to cut. Father has cut some of his buckwheat. It is quite light as is buckwheat generally. The gardens are almost all dried up. It does not seem to me that I ever saw such dry weather.

Mother has gone down to Aunt Delila’s to take your letter and read Uncle Lanson’s letter. I wish Uncle Lanson instead of coming viewing could move out. We are not satisfied yet. We want all of our dear friends near us, but that we do not expect to have again in this world but Oh, I do hope Uncle Lanson will come soon. I am going to write to Ermina in a few days. We have so much to do that I scarcely get time to write. I have got so I can sew quite well with my thumb. Our girl finished our spinning some weeks ago except the stocking wool 7 lbs and I have been ever since trying to get that spun. I do not spin the yarn, double, twist, get it washed fast as Grandmother can knit it up, but I guess I shall get it done by winter though.

Lewis Gunderman and family arrived in this county last week. They are at Mr. Munson’s. They are coming here this week. Uncle Jonathan saw him Monday morning. He and Mr. Munson were looking at a place owned by Mr. Taylor as you go to Shashaban. It joins Mr. Munson on the west. Mrs. Munson and her oldest daughter have both had the ague but have both missed it now.

Uncle Jonathan raised his barn two weeks ago last Tuesday. There was quite a party of women besides the men; Mrs. Munson, Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Lowry, Mother, Abby, Mrs. Stevens, the girls they had to work for them, and myself. Aunt Betty could not come. Delfina had the ague. She come over as far as our house and stayed there. Aunt Rebecca had the thrashers to attend to so she could not come. The barn went up pretty well. They eat their suppers and went home before dark. Mother says I must tell you she has not been a visiting but very few times since you were here except to Aunt Delila’s and there she will go, work or not. I have not drinked tea there but twice yet. Mother has not been to Aunt Rebecca’s since that afternoon before you went away. We have had three roast pig dinners — the first one we invited Joshua, Jemima, and Amry, Susan and Marion, and Peter. Had quite a merry party. They enjoyed the dinner well. After dinner they played awhile, then they came in the house and I played them a few tunes on the accordion and they all started for home in high spirits. The next one we did not invite anybody. The third one we invited Uncle Longstreet* and Aunt Rebecca, Uncle Lewis and Aunt Betsey, Uncle Jonathan* and Aunt Delila, and Sally Ann Fairchild, which together with our family made quite a company round the table. [* Uncle Longstreet and Uncle Jonathan could not come.] We are going to kill one more. Then I am going to invite Moses, Paul, and Abraham, and Abby, and I do not know but one or two other girls.

We have taken in a physician to board with us which makes our family larger, and some considerable trouble, although he is not down stairs much when he is home. He has the room upstairs to himself except when we have company to stay all night. We have got a post office established at Mr. Kile’s called the Jersey Post Office, Oakland County, Michigan.

I must close for father wants to write a few lines to Grandfather. Mother sends her love. Emma says Grandmother Predmore gone to Jersey, never come back, tell Aunt Sarah or Aunt Ann Eliza, please to write and I will answer. Your affectionate granddaughter, — Mary Losey

Dear Parents,

Your letter wished me to see Scott and ascertain his price for his farm. I have not as yet seen him but will endeavor to shortly. I have thrashed my wheat on the other farm; had 160 bushels. Degraw had about the same. The new ground had on my part 80 bushels ____ clear & good seed. I have commenced sowing the ___ first and have today got 32 bushels sowed Friday September 10th. Have sowed about 2/3 of the new ground and the piece of old land next. Mr. Lousy shall endeavor to finish next week. I have got my buckwheat cut but have not commenced my corn yet, but it needs it and shall begin tomorrow. The season has been too dry for corn or buckwheat. We had a nice shower on Wednesday the 8th, but too late for corn & buckwheat. I hope if you all think best and can arrange your business so that Lanson may come out even yet this fall. We sent him to come and the church needs him. I am afraid Jonathan will not take up his crop but we do hope he may, the Lord give him grace so to do. I had intended to write a whole letter but Mary had commenced this and nearly filled it up.

Very respectfully yours, — Philip Losey

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