1847: Willard Martin to William G. Cutting

This letter was written by Willard Martin (1786-1849) of Hinsdale, New Hampshire. It was written soon after the death of his wife, Lucretia (Haughton) Martin (1791-1847), who we learn from this letter died on 17 August 1847. Their two sons are mentioned in the letter: Oscar Jackson Martin (b. 1815) and Edward Haughton Martin (b. 1817). Another son, Willard Wheeler Martin, died in 1832 at the age of 5 years, 9 months.

Willard wrote the letter to his younger sister, Martha Bridgham Martin (1809-1884) and her husband, William G. Cutting (1810-1875), who were residents of Rochester, New York in 1847. The 30 December 1884 issue of the New York Herald-Tribune reports that Mrs. Martha B. Cutting died of “paralysis” on 28 December at the home of her nephew L. W. Badger in Wyoming, New Jersey. Her husband had previously died there on the 12th of September, 1875.

Martin’s obituary reads as follows:

Died. In Hinsdale, (N. H.) 14th Oct., 1849, Willard Martin, esq, aged 62. Mr. Martin was formerly extensively known as one of the first merchants in the town of Guilford (Vt.), where he was long distinguished as one of the principal citizens of that place. Honest and upright in his dealings, and generous and kind in his deportment, he won the confidence and enjoyed the respect of all who knew him. As a merchant he was distinguished for his probity, and as a citizen for his kindness and generosity. For many years he received almost the universal suffrage of the town as a Represenative in the State Legislature, and he honorably discharged the duties pertaining to the many offices with which he was entrusted. He died in a firm, unshaken hope of meeting his friends again in that house not made with hands, which is eternal in the heavens.

Stampless Cover

Page 1

Page 2

Page 3

TRANSCRIPTION

Addressed to William G. Cutting, Esq., Rochester, New York
Care of Joseph C. Stone, Esq.

Hinsdale, New Hampshire
August 24th 1847

Brother W. G. & Sister Martha B. Cutting

Your letter of June 3rd was received in due course of mail and were well pleased to hear from you, and that you were in the enjoyment of tolerable good health. I am well pleased to be informed that you have fallen into the hands of Joseph, not of old, but a Joseph of our day and generation. I think him from the acquaintance that I have with him to possess all of the kind and noble traits of character that were possessed by his name sake of ancient Egyptian times. Do all that you can to promote the best interest and happiness of your good friends Joseph and Mary. Buoy up under your afflictions and troubles — they are much less than mine as you will learn in the sequel. My hope and prayer is that your latter days may be your best and most prosperous and happy days of your lives, and that our Heavenly Father will bless you in _____ and store.

Your Sister Mrs. James Mowry died of disease called Typhus Fever. Lucius P. Mowry, Esq. son was drowned in the River near his house some time since. James W. Mowry lives in his new house on the old farm and his brother lives with him, and I have been informed enjoys his usual health. Rev’d James W. preaches one half of the time at Green River. You ask me how I liked Brother Philips’ wife. I can say that I liked her general appearance well, thin her quite a good and intelligent woman, think he has done well in his new matrimonial connection. I cannot give you any information relative to Susan Ann — only that she married Dwight Shearer in a private manner and without the consent of her Father, and that they live on his Mother’s farm and in the house with her. You may have my share in the great legacy that is said to have fallen to the Houghton Family in England for twenty five cents, if you will make a deposit in the Rochester Bank of that amount.

Edward H. says he is going West in pursuit of business. Will he be able or likely to find employment in your Section of the country if he should go there soon?

I have been informed that brother Edward yet remains upon earth and in a very feeble state of health. He seems to live while many around him enjoying god health die and return to their mother earth.

Edward H. wishes you to ask Joseph C. Stone, Esq., if he can find a place in any kind of business for him in Rochester or vicinity, and sends his love and respects to you both — also his compliments to Mr. Stone.

Now I come to the heart-rending part of this epistle with weeping eyes and a throbbing heart, and have to inform you that Lucretia, my beloved and loving wife, has gone to the mansion of her Heavenly Father. She departed this life and bid us farewell on Tuesday the 17th instant, at eight o’clock in the morning. On Wednesday in the afternoon, she was interred in the burying ground at Guilford Center, by the side of her departed children, and near her Father and Mothers and Sisters. Funeral Services, Prayer at our dwelling house in Hinsdale by the Rev’d Mr. Jerould, Congregationalist. Sermon and other services in the Universalist Church at Guilford Center. Sermon by the Rev’d M. Willis of Brattleboro, Universalist.

Lucretia died as she had lived — a Christian of the Abrahamic faith in a full belief of the Ultimate Salvation of the Universal family of God, our Heavenly Father. She died without a murmur or a groan. When last moments, she was calm and had her senses. About two hours before she ceased to breathe, she told me that she was dying. I asked her how I could possibly get along alone through time with me here without her care and attention to me. She answered by saying that God would take care of me. How I shall manage and pass along through the short pilgrimage that I have to remain upon earth, I know not. There were people from all parts of the town who attended the funeral services and the church well filled.

Affectionately yours, &c. — Willard Martin

Widow Hannah Cutting and son William B. came to Hinsdale to see us the same day that Lucretia died, and arrived a short time after she had breathed her last breath. Mrs. Cutting lamented that she did not come the day previous. Had she not have been disappointed in her calculations, she would have come in season to have seen Lucretia while living, which would have been a great consolation to them both, as they were always intimate and friendly.

Oscar J. wishes to be remembered and sends his respects to all of you.

May the blessings of our Heavenly Father rest upon you evermore. Wish you to write to me as soon as convenient after receiving this letter. — W. M.

FOOTNOTES

The “Widow Cutting” referenced in the letter was Hannah (Brockett) Cutting (1791-1868), who was married to Samuel Cutting (1791-1842) of Guilford, Vermont. From this letter we learn that she came with her son William Brockett Cutting (b. 1827) to see Lucretia Martin on her deathbed but arrived too late.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Spared & Shared 15

Saving History One Letter at a Time

The Civil War Letters of George Messer

Company F, 107th Illinois Volunteer Infantry

Jeff's Prayers are as Effective as Abe's

The Civil War Letters of George S. Youngs, 126th New York Vols

Soldiering is a Very Uncertain Game

The Civil War Letters of Lemuel Glidden, Co. K, 145th Indiana Infantry

Tough as a Pitch Pine Knot

Letters of John Whitcomb Piper, 4th Massachusetts Heavy Artillery

An Honorable Peace

The Civil War Letters of Frank B. Knause, 6th Michigan Infantry & Heavy Artillery

Looking for a Rebel to Give him a Pop

Letters to & from Sgt. John Henry Ward, 93rd PA Inf

Civil War Letters of William H. H. Kinsey

Co. H, 28th Illinois Infantry

Spared & Shared 14

Saving History One Letter at a Time

The 1863 Diary of Thomas Wilbur Manchester

A Rhode Island Soldier in the American Civil War

The Daniels/Stone Digital Archives

A Collection of Family Civil War Era Letters & Ephemera

Spared & Shared 13

Saving Civil War History One Letter At A Time

Spared & Shared 12

Saving history one letter at a time

Dear Nellie

Civil War Letters of Thomas L. Bailey

Homefront Letters to Mark Rankin

Co. B, 27th Massachusetts Vols.

These Troubling Times...

The Civil War Letters of William H. Walton, Co. B, 3rd New Hampshire

Reluctant Yanks

The Civil War Letters of Joseph F. & B. Franklin Orr, Co. F, 76th Ohio Infantry

Hunting rebels as a dog would a fox....

The Civil War Letters of George W. Scott of Co. I, 46th Massachusetts (Militia)

The Civil War Letters of William Hunt Goff

Company H, 24th Massachusetts

The Charles Wetmore Broadfoot Letters

Aide de Camp to Gen. Theophilus H. Holmes

Spared & Shared 11

Saving History One Letter at a Time

Billy Yank & Johnny Reb Letters

Civil War Letters Transcribed by Griff

To the Front

The Civil War Letters of David Brett, 9th Massachusetts Light Artillery

Dear Jack

Letters received by Dr. John William Crapster O'Neal

For the Union

Civil War Letters of William Freeland, Co. F, 132nd New York Infantry

I shall be Willing to Suffer

The Civil War Letters of Marquis Lafayette Holt of the 3rd New Hampshire Infantry

"Shall the Union be Preserved?"

The Civil War Letters of William Henry Hodgkins -- Co. B, 36th Massachusetts

The Civil War Letters of William Busby

A Private in Co H, 20th Iowa Vols

Diary of Henry Knox Danner

The Civil War Experience of a Private in Co. K, 30th Pennsylvania Infantry (1862-1864)

Franklin S. Twitchell

Co. B, 13th Connecticut Infantry

The Civil War Letters of Henry E. Mumford

A Colored Soldier of Co. B, 29th Connecticut Infantry

No Babies Play

Letters of Joseph Hazen, Co. F, 20th New York Cavalry

I Long to See You Again

The Civil War Letters of Willis McDonald, Co. F, 17th Connecticut Infantry

I stood in my tracks

The Civil War Letters of Benjamin F. Hulburd, 7th & 2nd Vermont Infantries

This fight will tell the story

Letters by Harlan P. Martin, Co. E, 123rd N.Y.V.

The Rebecca Breidenstein Collection

Letters addressed to Rebecca by both her first & second husbands during the Civil War

The Smoke of my Rifle

A small collection of letters by Capt. Augustus Alonzo Hoit of Co. G, 8th Maine Infantry

Trumpet of Freedom

Civil War Letters of Cyrus E. Ferguson -- a soldier and bugler of the 15th Iowa Infantry

The Bowdoinham Letters

Civil War Letters addressed to the Brown Family of Bowdoinham, Maine

"I am for war, till slavery is dead"

The Civil War Letters of Jerome Bonaparte Burrows, Captain of the 14th Ohio Independent Battery

"All glory to our flag -- and to those who defend it!"

Seven Civil War Letters by Col. Augustus Abel Gibson

"Mother, don't worry about me"

The Civil War Letters of Caleb & John B. Chase, 3rd & 9th Minnesota Infantries

"They will get but little duty out of me"

The Civil War Letters of Silas Townsend, 29th Mass Infantry & 3rd Mass Cavalry

"Teach my Hands to War..."

The Civil War Letters of John Hancock Boyd Jenkins, 40th New York Infantry

"It is Life or Victory Now"

The Civil War Letters of Pvt. Eli Caress, Co A, 50th Indiana Volunteers

In the Trough of the Sea

The Civil War Letters of Dr. Allen Smith Heath from Aboard the USS Daylight

From the Bottom of My Heart

The Digital Archives of the Hodgdon/Rayner Letters

%d bloggers like this: